Tag Archives: Mixology

Australian Whisky: Rising Through The Ranks

 

Starward Distillery in Melbourne, Australia

 

As you may or may not already know, a growing number of countries around the world are entering the global whisky market and creating competition for the long-established brands we know and love. Australia happens to be one of the countries that’s quickly making it’s mark on the whisky scene, with more than 120 distilleries currently listed there.

Sullivan’s Cove is one of the oldest and most renowned Australian whisky distilleries, founded in 1994 with a focus on creating entirely Australian whisky from locally sourced Tasmanian barley and water. Since then Sullivan’s Cove has rapidly emerged into the industry, winning numerous awards over the years including an award for “World’s Best Single Malt” in 2014 at the World Whiskies Awards.

Many other Australian distilleries are hopeful about expanding into worldwide markets in the near future. Starward Distillery (pictured above) is another globally recognized Australian whisky brand with a strong focus on exports to Western markets. Other Australian whiskies to keep an eye out for in the future include Hellyers Road, Limeburners, and Nant.

Does this mean we’ll see Australian whisky break through into the Western market and compete with some of our all-time favourite brands?¬† Read more >>>

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Build! Shake! Stir!

 

 

 

What can I get you?

 

 

Whether you’re at a bar to meet friends or to meet new ones, the drinks that are being served are either Built, Shaken or Stirred….. but what’s the difference and why does it make a difference?

Lets break it down….

Built drinks are things like a Rum and Coke or a Vodka with Club Soda – Glass-Ice-Alcohol-Mix-Garnish and Straw, EASY!!!

Stirred drinks are things like a Negroni or a Manhattan – Mixing Glass-Spirit-Ice-Stir-Strain into appropriate glass

Shaken drinks are things like a Cosmopolitan or a Whiskey Sour – Shaking glass-Mix-Spirit-Ice-Shake-Strain into appropriate glass

Built drinks are the easiest of the three and 60% of drinks in a busy nightclub are made like this. What about the other 40% of drinks?

20% of drinks would be BEER!!! After that everything else is either shaken or stirred.

 

Bartenders all over the world have their own method of shaking and stirring with their own style and panache. With proper training you learn that although¬†Ice is your friend in a lot of cocktails one doesn’t want to OVER dilute drinks with improper use of our frozen friend H2O. Whether stirring or shaking a cocktail ice should always be added to the mixing glass AFTER the ingredients have been added, this will minimize the dilution and result in a better cocktail. Stirring is a technique, usually reserved for ‘Spirit-forward’ cocktails (cocktails without any non-alcoholic ingredients) and is all about preparing a drink with ice to both chill and dilute the drink without bruising the spirit. Shaking is the most fun way of making a cocktail and has been taken to unbelievable levels of style by bartenders who want to impress their guests. A good shake can be the difference between a great drink and a happy guest or a bad one and a disappointed guest. Shaking not only chills a cocktail, dilutes it and mixes the ingredients together but it can also introduce air, texture or ‘mouth-feel’ to a libation. With the addition of egg whites to a cocktail like an Amaretto sour, when shaken can dramatically change the dynamic of the feeling that is experienced when sipping on it.

 

Question: Whats the best method to use?

Answer: It all depends on what drink you’re making.

 

So, grab your shaking tins and bar spoons and figure out how you are going to build, shake and stir with passion, style and your own little twist.

 

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What is the Importance of Ice

 

 

Enticing yes...

 

Ice is‚Ķ. An Integral Component of Every cocktail, under the general definition of a cocktail being ‚Äúan alcoholic beverage which includes: Sugar, Bitters and Water (Ice)‚ÄĚ. Whether it is being used to chill a cocktail, mix ingredients together, for dilution and water content or simply just to take up space in a glass ‚Äď Ice is just as important as the drink itself.

¬†Bartending classes teach, about how much Ice a bartender should use in each cocktail being made, both in cocktails with a mixer for example a Whiskey Sour or even something as simple as a Rum and Coke and in ‚Äėspirit- forward‚Äô cocktails such as a Negroni or a Manhattan. These applications are concerned with ice in the final product, but what about drinks that are served with no ice?

Question: What does ‚ÄėNeat‚Äô mean?

Answer: NO ICE!!! A drink served neat, would be a shot of liquor that has had no contact with Ice. It’s gone straight from the bottle to the glass.

So what does ‚ÄėStraight-Up‚Äô mean? Ever had a Cosmopolitan or a Vodka Martini with Ice in it? I doubt it. Now think about this‚Ķ..Have you ever seen a bartender shake or stir a drink, then strain the drink into a glass with no ice? This cocktail would be called a ‚ÄėStraight-Up‚Äô cocktail.

So to simplify, both ‚ÄėStraight-Up‚Äô and ‚ÄėNeat‚Äô drinks are served without Ice. The difference is that ‚ÄėStraight-Up‚Äô cocktails have had contact with ice at some point leading up to being served.

As mentioned earlier, Ice can be used to take up space in a glass. “Why wouldn’t I just use a smaller glass?” I can hear you all asking. Have you ever had a Mojito served straight-up or in a short glass with no Ice? Crushed Ice is used in the classic Mojito recipe, because not only does it keep the drink ‘Ice” cold, it takes up space in the glass allowing the drink to contain less liquid, but still appear to be a tall, grande, gesture from your favourite bartender.

Egg whites are becoming a commonly used ingredient in a whole range of different libations. Just like pineapple juice, the egg whites will emulsify under heavy shaking or whisking creating a foam. The Ice used in the shaker tin almost acts as a whisk and helps the process of emulsification during shaking, in such cocktails as the Whiskey Sour or the Gin Fizz.

Question: How important is ‘Dilution’?

Answer: In many cases, it is very important.

Many cocktail recipes include a shake or a stir, these are for both mixing the drink, making it cold and dilution.

Look out soon for the up-and-coming ‘Build, Shake, Stir’ blog.

Also, take a look at our molecular mixology program which will give you the lowdown on both liquid Nitrogen and Dry-Ice

 

 

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Is using the Jigger the new trend for mixology in 2014?

David Rios rised to fame in 2013 after being crowned as DIAGEO World Class Bartender of The Year. His forecast is that in 2014 cocktails will become cleaner, simpler and with a focus on masterful execution where serious mixologists will return to the basics with a special focus on achieving precision by using the jigger for every pour.

If you took part of the BartenderOne Masterclass to become a bartender, you probably know that BartenderOne strongly advices perfecting the free pour instead of the use of jiggers to provide bartenders with a skill that sets the industry’s standards. For many years, the use of the jigger was associated with unexperienced or even worse ungenerous bartenders who would count every drop of alcohol driven by greedy bar owners trying to squeeze every cent out of the bottle. However, according to Rios, creating the perfect cocktail is more like baking than savory cooking requiring ¬†mathematical precision to achieve the results desired and the jigger stands out as the perfect tool to make perfect cocktails allowing to¬†manipulate the product in process without being forced to dump it out and start again

Among other trends, Rios mentions the return of classic cocktails like the Martini and a growing use of¬†theatrical elements to the making of clients’ drinks, the appearance of¬†bottled cocktails, flavored ice cubes and locally-produced spirits.

What’s your opinion on this subjet? What do you think are gonna be the trends in the cocktail and mixology world for 2014? Let us know your opinion, you might be the next guru the industry needs!!
ORIGINAL SOURCE:

“World’s best bartender says to expect cocktails to be simpler in 2014” Daily News Online. Available at:

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/eats/cocktails-cleaner-simpler-2014-article-1.1561496#ixzz2peKcsjtd

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The art of cocktail creation ‚Äúthe Ipour experience‚ÄĚ

Grannys liquor

As a follow up to my previous blog ‚ÄúSyrup & Spirit Sundays‚ÄĚ I have decided to share my cocktail creation experiences with you. What follows is a step by step breakdown of how our cocktail was created and thought process behind our syrups, infusions, and ultimately the end product!

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Syrup & Spirit Sundays

Syrups & Infusions

Inspired by my experience taking the Bartenderone IBC course, fellow Bartenderone instructor Jay Patience and I decided to undertake a weekly mission to create some ‚Äúoff the beaten path‚ÄĚ syrups and infusions. The first step in our mission was a unique and groundbreaking brainstorming session where we were able to discuss a wide variety of ingredients and spirits. We anticipated the best place to start would be an urban market where we were introduced to an array of herbs, spices, and fruits that are not traditionally found in cocktails. The result for us was a countertop full of ingredients fit for more like a cooking class then a mixology experience.

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Falernummmmmmm…

What is Falernum?

What is Falernum?

Falernum – really the name seems to just roll off the tongue right? Emphasis on the num part here or should we say the ‚Äėyum‚Äô part because here at BartenderOne there is nothing better than a bit of quality homemade Falernum in your Caribbean style cocktails.

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BartenderOne in New York

Gin and Pears and Rosemary, Oh My!

Gin and Pears and Rosemary, Oh My!

Imagine walking into a phone booth, dialling a number, and being redirected back to a world of sipping cocktails next to Charlie Chaplin, Louis Armstrong, and Ella Fitzgerald……

On March 11th of this year, I traveled to New York to experience some of North America’s finest Speakeasies and Mixology bars. With only having one amazing speakeasy in Toronto, we were eager to head to the Big Apple and meet the bartenders that compete in Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans.

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Bar Chef Finals – Winter 2011

Have you wished you could jump behind a bar with hundreds of ingredients, tastes, and ideas and be able to create the cocktail of your dreams?

On April 4th, 2011 the BartenderOne Bar Chef Finals took place at Empire Lounge in Toronto in Yorkville. As students, the mixologists had completed tasting over five hundred different spirits, bitters, liqueurs, sweeteners, types of citrus, infused foams and spirits, along with homemade syrups.

As mixologists, the students were asked to create an original cocktail from each of the 5 spirit categories. The cocktails could have been made with anything that the mixologists could think of; but were required to hold dear the traditional balanced cocktail theory. While they did have guidelines for balance, there were none for flavour profiles or presentation. Mixologists could incorporate elements that were taught in class such as: infusion, fatwashing, bruleeing, molecular mixology, spherification, custom foams, misting and much more.

As the student mixologists watched tentatively, their cocktails were tasted by three of Toronto’s top mixologists; Rob Montgomery, Gavin MacMillan and Scott McMaster. The students were were delighted to see that their hard work and development had paid off. The judges were impressed by all of the thought and effort that was incorporated into the final cocktails. The mixologists showed that they weren’t scared to test some boundaries in coming up with their very own recipes, and here are the top cocktails entered:

VODKA COCKTAILS

Strawbarb Bullets by Krissy Calkins

Strawbarb Bullets by Krissy Calkins

STRAWBARB BULLETS – By Mixologist Krissy Calkins

2/3 oz Strawberry reduction (no sugar added)
1/3 oz Rhubarb reduction (no sugar added)
1 oz Vodka
Shaken on Ice
Strain into Chocolate Cups
Float – Vanilla bean infused simple syrup on top
Served on a bed of Gram Crackers

Rainbow 1943 By Elizabeth Saad

Rainbow 1943 By Elizabeth Saad

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Something to tickle those tastebuds….

Thirsty?

Thirsty?

SOMETHING BLUE

A study was done in the bar industry with the purpose to find out what colour is the most effective to drive sales. Without question, the overwhelming result proved that blue was the way to go. As a bartender, if I make a blue cocktail such as a Banana Popsicle martini, or a Blue cosmo, without fail someone will see it and come up to my bar and ask for ‚Äúthat blue drink‚ÄĚ.

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